1   +   7   =  
A password will be e-mailed to you.

Whew, it’s been a long few weeks in and around the city, and with the whirlwind that was Pitchfork to Lollapalooza, plenty got lost in translation. Fear not though, Mild Sauce has you covered with a quick catch up on an assortment of new music from Chicago that got visual representations. Included this time around are the headliners, plus some new work from fresher faces like Queen Key & Kidd Kenn plus those on the quick rise like Juice Wrld and Valee, proving the city really never stops. Get in tune below and catch all the songs streaming regularly on Mild Sauce Radio.


Juice WRLD • “Lean Wit Me”

It’s crazy to think that we all assumed no one could come up faster than that first wave of Chicago acts that emerged the last couple of years, but Juice WRLD has ingle-jadedly demolished expectations en route to becoming one of the most exciting faces in music today, and underlined his marquee year with another talented video, this one for “Lean Wit Me”. The sheer production value in the video is a nod to how far the kid has come in a year and comes on the heels of his documentary release and show with Apple Music at Concord Music Hall a few weeks ago. Juice Wrld is very much on his way, and this very dope, if at times abstract, visual does wonders to add to an already layered offering.

Seb Torgus • “Good Times”

Our boy Sen Torgus took a month or two off after making a splash with his “Hold Up” visual back in March but the newfound L.A. native got back in the spotlight the right way, by teaming up with Verluxe for a striking new cinematic piece for “Good Times”.

Torgus is always one for antics and characters and takes on a slightly different persona in this one, albeit one that doesn’t come off as forced or contrived. Here, we follow the story of a boy and a girl out on, well, looking for a good time. They tend to find them and then some, and the expert background work from hometown squad Verluxe makes a good idea come to life in vivid colors capes and well-heeled shot choices. Without trying, its more of a short film than many who claim to be. Seb seems comfortable once again within himself and we can’t wait to see what on the way (full length??).

Valee • “Juice & Gin”

Since emerging last year, Valee has made a name for himself through off-kilter rhyme schemes and a style and flow that seem to angle just outside the norm, even for contemporary rap. With that in mind, the aesthetics that surround his latest video for the standout single “Juice & Gin” off his G.O.O.D. You Found Me project fit perfectly in line with the overall vibe that he’s provided thus far.

Featuring more than a few cameos throughout, the video perfectly embodies the quick up and comer from Chicago as he delivers his bars with trademarked ambivalence while juxtaposed against some strikingly weird backdrops. Local creative director and latex enthusiast Daniela De Luna makes an appearance, and helped put together much of the trip ambience that drives the video. Valee, who made his Lollapalooza debut this week, is most certainly on a run, and despite folks like Tekashi trying to bite his flows, he proves here his unique brand of weirdness is all his own.

Ty Money • “First Day Out”

Ty Money has been one of the more exciting names around Chicago for some time. Unfortunately, things some time get in the way and Ty’s been working for the last year or so to overcome some past problems, and finally got a breath of fresh air at long last with the release of his very indicative single, “First Day Out”.
Ty seems appropriately hungry on this one and rightfully so. Similarly, the video places images of him quite literally walking out of prison next to others of him throwing money in the air next to a new whip. First day out shit. In all seriousness it’s awesome to see dude out and this first single is an ode to things on the way. We can’t wait.

Queen Key & Kidd Kenn • “Eriod”

Queen Key and Kidd Kenn have more in common than just being from Chicago. The two rising MCs have caught on in the last year to differing degrees, but their general messages that permeate their songs is one of openness and inclusion without the typical niceties that often are perceived to come along with it. Essentially, they’re them through and through and unabashed in their opinions and their words. So it was perfect that they got together for “Eriod”.

No more articles